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indicates the slow pace of the island's Romanization, since the very last locally minted coins still bear inscriptions in Ancient Greek on the obverse (like "ΜΕΛΙΤΑΙΩ", meaning "of the Maltese") and Punic motifs, showing the resistance of the Greek and Punic cultures.

The culture apparently disappeared from the Maltese Islands around 2500 BC.

Archaeologists speculate that the temple builders fell victim to famine or disease, but this is not certain.

Malta is a popular tourist destination with its warm climate, numerous recreational areas, and architectural and historical monuments, including three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum, in reference to Malta's many bays and coves. the islands were invaded by the Aghlabids in AD 870.

Few other etymological mentions appear in classical literature, with the term Malta appearing in its present form in the Antonine Itinerary (Itin. The fate of the population after the Arab invasion is unclear but it seems the islands may have been completely depopulated and were likely to have been repopulated in the beginning of the second millennium by settlers from Arab-ruled Sicily who spoke Siculo-Arabic.

Animal bones and a knife found behind a removable altar stone suggest that temple rituals included animal sacrifice.

Tentative information suggests that the sacrifices were made to the goddess of fertility, whose statue is now in the National Museum of Archaeology in Valletta.

This day is known as Freedom Day and Malta declared itself as a neutral and non-aligned.

Malta joined the European Union on and joined the Eurozone on 1 January 2008.

Malta's location in the middle of the Mediterranean has historically given it great strategic importance as a naval base, and a succession of powers, including the Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Normans, Sicilians, Spanish, Knights of St. Under the Malta Independence Act, passed by the British Parliament in 1964, Malta gained independence from the United Kingdom as an independent sovereign Commonwealth realm, officially known from 1964 to 1974 as the State of Malta, with Elizabeth II as its head of state. A significant prehistoric Neolithic culture marked by Megalithic structures, which date back to c.

The country became a republic in 1974, and although no longer a Commonwealth realm, remains a member state of the Commonwealth of Nations. 3600 BC, existed on the islands, as evidenced by the temples of Mnajdra, Ggantija and others.

After 2500 BCE, the Maltese Islands were depopulated for several decades until the arrival of a new influx of Bronze Age immigrants, a culture that cremated its dead and introduced smaller megalithic structures called dolmens to Malta.