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This gold was proverbial for its purity until the 10th century.

This change heralded the Carolingian revival of the denarius.

Coinage supply to Britain was interrupted when the mints of Roman Gaul were closed about 395, and scarcely any gold or silver coin entered Britain during about 450–550.

Thessalonica, Nicomedia, Cyzicus, Antioch, and Alexandria struck bronze only; at one time or another Rome struck gold and bronze, while Syracuse and Catana also contributed.

The technique of gold and silver minting was generally high; that of bronze was coarse, and overstriking was common.

The fall of Roman power in the West left the gold currency of the Byzantine Empire undisturbed; it was to become the most dominant single influence in European coinage for 1,000 years, competing at first with the gold of the Arab caliphates and later with that of the great Italian commercial republics as well.

Byzantine coinage, in its continuity, contrasted strongly with the often erratic monetary systems from the 5th to the 7th century in western Europe, where Germanic invaders inherited the apparatus, money included, of the Roman Empire.

The most prolific mints were Mérida, Toledo, Sevilla, Tarragona, and Córdoba.